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Look & Listen Reviews Roundups

Who-Knew-Vember: TGG Roundup

Hopefully this month’s roundup finds you well-rested (probably not), well-nourished (maybe if you’re lucky) and in your bag (in this economy?). With 2021 and the holiday season looming like a turkey vulture on a hot day, I believe we all may need a little reprieve from 2020’s dark realities. I come to you bearing gifts and a feast of a different sort– a feast for your ears. If you’re hungry for a little appe-teaser, check out my autumn playlist, updated daily. Tuck your napkins in, say grace and prepare to eat.

“Notice Me” – Fana Hues

25-year old singer-songwriter, Fana Hues pays homage to her roots with her latest single’s music video, which stars all 8 of her siblings and both of her parents, augmenting the song’s true meaning to Hues. Drawing from an arsenal of inspiration from the likes of Beyoncé and Anita Baker, “Notice Me” serves as a profound tribute to the artist’s upbringing.

Hues reflected on the song in a press release: “…I had found a sound that truly felt like me, so I was extra hyped about everything. I was rooted and reminded that all the things I doubted myself about, all my fears were ‘just an unpleasant dream.’ Just like my mom had said. At every turn of my life that I find clarity and meaning, I go back to the truest form of faith that I know, which is my Family. So when I shot the video, I just had to have that moment with my people.” The video, directed by Amira Hadiya, closes with an aerial shot of Hues enveloped by the arms of her family.

“Be With Me” – Miki Fiki

You might listen to Miki Fiki and wonder exactly what it is that sets them apart from your typical alt-rock indie band– one of those can’t-quite-put-my-finger-on-it ordeals. Hint: it’s the lack of guitar. The Nashville-based quartet consists of lead singer and keyboardist Ted Hartog, Julia Meredith providing all that sweet, sweet wind and brass, Alex Clayton on percussion and Hunter Mulkey on bass. Ted describes Miki Fiki’s sound as playful, saying, “I’ve been a bit sensitive my whole life, and time always seems to reveal an element of drama in those emotionally-charged experiences. [The emotions] are valid and what you feel is what you feel. But this band is a place to look at those emotions, those real, lived-experiences, and throw a soft smile on the whole thing.”

The band’s latest single, “Be With Me” is a declaration of ultimatums and boundaries in what one might call a “situationship.” The context of the song would be painfully transparent if it wasn’t so elegantly draped in those hopeful instrumentals Miki Fiki executes so well, softening the blow. The words “I don’t need to make you love me” never sounded so sweet.

England. – Gus Harvey

UK-based alternative R&B artist Gus Harvey released her 4-track EP, England., back in May. With a sound self-described as “UK street soul with grimy basslines,” Harvey takes us on a bit of a wild ride with this 14-minute EP. The artist gets in touch with her roots, literally, on the first track, “Garden,” which is written from the perspective of the earth. The second track, “The Frangipani Fellowship” goes deeper and darker as a diss track with experimental sampling of once-romantic-turned-ominous Cambodian music. Harvey slows things down with the last two tracks on the EP, allowing a brief but plaintive peek at unabashed vulnerability, specifically with the EP’s stripped-down standout, “Albion.”

there goes the neighborhood. – grouptherapy.

Fresh-faced LA hip-hop collective groupthrapy. released their debut album, there goes the neighborhood. in late October. Consisting of Jadagrace, KOI, and TJW, grouptherapy. brings a three-course meal to the table with their latest project. The group released an EP earlier this year titled this is not the album. which prepared us for the heat to come on there goes the neighborhood. With a trio as talented and versatile as this, we’re given a different flavor with each track on the album.

In the project’s intro, “yessir,” we enter the group session with confident words of affirmation: “Look like diamonds when I glow / Turn my trauma into commas / Take my time before I go.” Further along in the project, we have Jadagrace providing untamed and well-timed idiomatic bars over a Dee Lilly beat on the project’s first single, “raise it up!” which was released with a nostalgic music video paying homage to an early 2000’s classic, Bring It On. Things slow down with the project’s latest single, “watercolor,” a melodic track clothed in R&B. The project’s striking and abstract artwork is brought to us by ASLUR, which sees the three members distortedly and pleasantly portrayed in blue, orange and purple.

Therapy Through an LP – Nocturnal

From Connecticut-based hip-hop artist Nocturnal, conceptual album Therapy Through an LP has found a home in my library, and here’s hoping this project couch-surfs its way over to yours as well. The 15-track project cleverly begins with the outro which then leads into the spoken intro– a dialogue between the artist and a therapist over distorted dial tones and rising strings, preparing us for the voyage ahead. Nocturnal lays it all to bear throughout the project, staying true to the theme. Nostalgic, hungry production is a puzzle-piece perfect fit with Nocturnal’s classic cadence and merciless lyricism; Therapy Through an LP is a bloodthirsty and poignant exposition of what it means to feel without inhibition and leave it all on the page– or the mic.

“Broke Times” – Huckleberry Funk

Bringing in some hometown pride, we have Indiana-based Huckleberry Funk entering the ring with “Broke Times,” which hits a little too close to home. The best way to describe Huckleberry Funk is as a melting pot of sound– a sprinkle of hip-hop, a pinch of R&B, dash of soul and a whole lot of funk, of course.

In an email to TGG, Huck Funk’s lead singer Dexter Clardy details his hopes for how “Broke Times” may serve those who listen, saying the track “speaks a firm message that as people listen, it more hopefully can turn into more of an affirmation for folks to no longer allow themselves to be broken. Broken whether that be financially, in spirit or in faith in oneself.” Clardy continues with a concept I’m sure we’re all very familiar with, saying, “It’s very easy in this world we live in to get caught up in the day to day rat race of life, and follow the path we’ve been told all our lives. ‘Go to school, graduate, get a good job and you’ll be happy.’ We’re always told that we should follow dreams, but oftentimes aren’t encouraged, nor do we allow ourselves to do so once the time to actually grab life for ourselves comes.” Clardy closes with some final keys of wisdom: “We all have the same 24 hours, but what we do or don’t do with that time is up to us.”

“If I Gotta Run” – Tim Chadwick

Irish pop artist, Tim Chadwick is no stranger to identity confusion; in an interview with Gay Times, the artist spoke on his struggles with coming out, saying, “…when I came out I was actually struck with a lot more anxiety than I had before, because now there was this expectation that I would be my true and authentic self – but if you’ve never been that, how do you know what that is? I came out when I was 21, and it’s taken me until now – and you can see it in the music – to own my sexuality and finally be comfortable in a setting where everyone else is so proud and just being themselves. I tried to fit in to be straight and that didn’t work, so I was like, obviously I need to come out, but then it was like, ‘I don’t know how to act now’. It wasn’t that big euphoric coming out that I thought it would be. It was very much like, ‘Oh well now I have even more soul-searching and growing up to do’.”

Since 2019’s “I Need To Know,” the artist’s career has seen a steady incline and Chadwick is leaning into his booming emo-pop sound with his latest, “If I Gotta Run.” The single’s predecessor “Only Me” personally read me for filth so you could imagine my excitement at a new release from this one-of-a-kind artist– thankfully, I was not disappointed. “If I Gotta Run” couldn’t have come at a more perfect time for my fellow singletons during the most confusing time of the year: cuffing season. Chadwick is set to release a 5-track EP in January of 2021, so for now, we’ll be dancing in our bedrooms alone, eating the crumbs he’s so graciously left for us.

“Terry Crews” – Lo Village

TGG favorite Lo Village released an open letter in the form of “Terry Crews” to the actor back in October. In case you missed it, the actor has been in the hot seat for quite some time for his controversial takes on the BLM movement via Twitter. Lo Village’s discordant single, produced by Frankie Scoca features pensive verses from group members Ama, Kane and Tyler. The track is not only a letter to Crews but is addressed to others whose perspective might have become blurred by their own celebrity and status, as the melodic phrase “the money not gon’ save you” is sprinkled throughout. With the single comes a can’t-look-away visual from 3D artist, Daun, where Crews’s warped and lifeless floating head rolls to and fro.

If after this feast, you’re still hungry, listen to the roundup playlist, updated every month:

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Roundups

It’s Oct-Over: TGG Roundup

Disoriented and emerging from a cocoon of despondency, it is I, Jessica. I have arrived to perform my civic duties of providing you, my friends and readers, with the fuel we all need to power through these dark days– those good, old fashioned bops. Join me as we traverse my library’s recent history and enjoy the roundup playlist. For extra sauce, follow my autumn playlist, updated daily to decorate the season’s memories. Now, back to our semi-regularly scheduled programming.

“The Hardest Part” – Olivia Dean

Drawing inspiration from brutally honest songwriters like Amy Winehouse, east London’s Olivia Dean has no qualms about airing out dirty laundry. With her latest single, “The Hardest Part,” Dean unleashes uncomfortable truths about the struggles of moving on with an undeniably catchy hook. “The Hardest Part” is one of those songs you wish was just a minute longer; Dean’s smooth-as-butter vocals in tandem with the chorus’s beat drop leaves you with no choice but to hit the “Repeat” button just 30 seconds in.

Home – Masukified

Chicago-based independent Masukified released 7-track EP, Home, a little later than he had originally planned. Just two days prior to the EP’s intended release, the artist announced that the EP wasn’t quite ready yet, pushing the release back 10 days. Home was worth the wait. An endearing and fervent tribute to the his roots, the project gives us an up-close-and-personal look into who Masukified, or TJ, is– not only as a creative but as a person. The EP’s first single, “Nice to Meet You,” is epitomal of this artist’s unique brand of goofy-meets-heartfelt hip-hop.

“Scream Drive Faster” – LAUREL

With LAUREL, we have another lyrical and vocal powerhouse Londoner on the list. DOGVIOLET, LAUREL’s hauntingly evocative debut album was released in August of last year but has sadly only recently been on my radar. LAUREL released her latest single, a collaborative effort with producer Chrome Sparks, almost a full year after DOGVIOLET’s release. On a road paved with electronica and spirited bass, “Scream Drive Faster” finds you running from your problems, riding passenger in Doc’s DeLorean as you travel time back to the 80’s.

Morph – Tiny Jag

Hailing from Detroit, artist Tiny Jag presents 6-track EP Morph. Garnering artistic inspiration from the likes of Santigold and MIA, Morph is a creative exploration into the slightly warped universe that is Tiny Jag’s mind. The artist flexes her versatility with unique bangers rooted in gritty Motor City hip-hop like “Gone Fishing,” “Twin Flame” and “Weapon” then later unlocking the emo-tinged “City Kids.”

The Daydream – Later.

This 16-minute EP from Parisian alt-pop band Later. is a wistful 5-song collection best described as smooth, like fresh pavement. Upon the first listen of this EP, I was immediately called to the open road, so I hopped right in my trusty chariot and took her for a quick drive. From the first zesty bass riff in “All the Time” to the final “oohs” in “Daydream,” this project embraces like a warm hug and leaves you in a daze.

Renaissance – Lola Young

Born from a union of neo-soul ethos and folk storytelling, we have the UK’s Lola Young next on the list. Renaissance, a 3-track bundle, follows the artist’s debut EP, Intro, released last November. The 19-year old BRIT school dropout grasps messy concepts of distorted love and romance with maturity and a little bit of bite on “Pick Me Up” and “Same Bed.” The trio of songs ends with the stripped and feisty diss track, “None For You.”

“Amber” – Unusual Demont

Wisconsin-based artist Unusual Demont’s forthcoming EP, Hues, is an aural memoir of the artist’s past relationships. A tasty appetizer before our presumably juicy main course, the artist’s debut single, “Amber” was released in August and has remained in rotation since.

Happiness in Liquid Form – Alfie Templeman

17-year old Alfie Templeman is just a kid who wants to make good music, unaffected by any other hullaballoo within the industry. That very same exuberance and thirst to create the wave is evident throughout Happiness in Liquid Form, the artist’s fourth EP. Templeman, who was allotted a myriad of musical opportunity in his upbringing, has made good use of his resources; the varietal and slightly experimental instrumentation throughout his catalogue is what sets him apart from others in the bedroom pop genre.

Thank God Its Monday – Malz Monday

Malz Monday’s debut album, Thank God Its Monday, is a staggering showcase of Malz’s talent with the pen and limitless sonic potential. An artist’s debut is oftentimes make or break; lucky for Malz, he possesses the raw talent, wit and hungry determination to make it. Having gained initial traction from his YouTube channel where he would post weekly freestyles, the New York rapper has come a long way, landing a spot on NBA 2K21’s soundtrack with his single “How It Is.”

“Take Me Where Your Heart Is” – Q

Rounding out the roundup is Florida native, neo-soul artist and anomaly, Q. Following his 2019 EP Forest Green, Q releases “Take Me Where Your Heart Is,” a romantic track that perfectly encapsulates the blind hope and excitement new love can bring. Q released an endearing music video for the single where he’s seen serenading the object of his affection in a bowling alley, capturing the innocence of young love.

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Look & Listen

August Roundup

Yet another month down in the boiling cauldron that is 2020! How did we get here? I honestly haven’t the slightest clue, and I don’t know about you, but August really tested my patience and well-being. Now, that’s enough negativity for today– let’s get to the goods. As per the norm here at The Greater Good, I’ll be guiding your tour today through Bop City, rounding up this month’s picks. Please keep your extremities to yourself at all times.
Follow the roundup playlist and save your favorites!

What Could Possibly Go Wrong – Dominic Fike

Dominic Fike’s debut album, What Could Possibly Go Wrong, was on regular rotation for me this month. Fike put himself on many people’s radars (including producer Kenny Beats) with 2017’s Don’t Forget About Me, Demos, which the artist recorded during house arrest and originally released while serving jail time. What Could Possibly Go Wrong is a body of work that mirrors Fike as an artist himself– unpredictable. As one of my good friends so accurately described the project: “He went from MGMT to Frank Ocean.” Favorite tracks: “What’s For Dinner?,” “Cancel Me,” “Good Game” and “Superstar Sh*t”

SuperGood – Duckwrth

“It’s classic, in essence — the shit that people fell in love with in the ’70s and ’80s and ’90s,” says Duckwrth of his major label debut, SuperGood. A romantic oeuvre, similar to Mac Miller’s The Divine Feminine, SuperGood seems like it was created for the ladies and those who love them. The album is a perfect summer send-off, with equal parts sonic nostalgia, sensual charisma and good, old-fashioned boppage. Favorite tracks: “Kiss U Right Now,” “Did U Notice?” “Tuesday” and “Super Good”

“Brown Skin” – Cam the Artisan

Atlanta rapper, Cam the Artisan made TGG’s playlist last month with smooth-as-butter and lionhearted “WYA?!” from his debut album, Hues. Cam’s latest single, “Brown Skin,” produced by Ashton McCreight, is just as addictive, to say the least. Another certified banger for the list, this record will provide nothing less than the best vibes for your summer function– money back guaranteed (by me).


“Something Good” – Harley Sulé

It wasn’t until after the 8th rotation of Harley Sulé’s “Something Good” that I came to the realization that I had been held hostage by a song. Please tell my mother I love her. The record is Sulé’s debut single under his own moniker; previously “anonymous” under soulful alias Jimi Charles Moody, the artist is nowhere near new to the game. The versatile artist also makes up one half of the UK hip-hop duo, Rizzle Kicks.
Surgeon General’s Warning: If consuming “Something Good,” be weary of your surroundings as it may take you the way it took me.

“Without Your Love” – APRE

APRE released “Without Your Love,” the second single from their forthcoming project, Always In Your Head, last week. The UK-based alt-pop duo consists of members Charlie Brown and Jules Konieczny. The artists summarized the single as being “about the idea that you shouldn’t force yourself to make the relationship work – appreciate what it’s done for you, and keep moving forward in your life.” The single is one of my favorite breeds of song– upbeat, hopeful production with contrasting somewhat somber lyrics. Always In Your Head is set to be released in November.

“Comfortable With Myself” – Blaine Legendary

Self-described as having a “demeanor like Clark Kent but a stage presence that’s Superman,” Blaine Legendary is comfortable with himself. So much so, he wrote a song about it and we’re that much better because of it. The single’s music video is a reminder that although this year is a dumpster fire, we’re all burning together, so why not make the best of it and enjoy ourselves in whatever way we can?

“WIYULD” – Evann McIntosh

Continuing the theme of self-love and self-acceptance, we have 16-year old Evann McIntosh entering the ring with leviathan-level confidence with her latest single, “WIYULD.” This alt-bedroom-pop anthem is a record for those who need reminding that they are indeed a force with which to be reckoned. I’m talking to you. Yeah, you.

rest up – boy pablo

Following recent singles “hey girl” and “honey,” Norwegian artist Boy Pablo recently released two-track single pack, rest up, in anticipation of his debut album, Watchito Rico. The DIY artist has fine-tuned his sound since the 2017 viral success of his single, “Everytime,” leaning into his specific brand of sleepy, romantic bedroom pop. Perfect for those nights in, “rest up” is an exemplary addition to your self-care playlist. Watchito Rico is set to release October 23rd. Watch the absurdly charming video for “hey girl”:

“SULA (Paperback)” – Jamila Woods

If you don’t know, I am a certified Jamila Woods stan. There’s simply no other way to put it, and I have no qualms about being labeled as such. The artist’s debut album, 2017’s HEAVN personally helped me through some tumultuous times. Her latest album, a conceptual project of sorts, last year’s LEGACY! LEGACY! highlighted influential Black figures throughout modern history, further solidifying her position as an icon herself. Her latest single, “SULA (Paperback)” pays delicate homage to the Toni Morrison novel. “Sula was the first Toni Morrison novel I ever read and it inspired the first chapbook of poems I ever wrote,” the artist said in a press release. After revisiting the novel years later, the artist said, “It reminded me to embrace my tenderness, my sensitivities, my ways of being in my body. This song is a mantra to allow myself space to experience my gender, love, intimacy, and sexuality on my own terms.”

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Look & Listen

The Nostalgia Tapes

Have you ever been driving to the store, minding your business, when you hear a song or certain formation of notes that transports you to a very specific point in your life and you’re met with a wave of memories or emotion? Always having had a fear of forgetting things, I began keeping track of these memories– curating a soundtrack for every year of my life for at least the last 10 years, and keeping journals specifically recounting the memories tied to each song. I like to call this time travel, but science likes to call it MEAM– music-evoked autobiographical memories.

Our memories have sensory triggers, and music is one of the most sensory forms of creativity– whether consuming or producing, the chances that you’re sitting still while doing so are slim. The ways in which music can engage numerous senses at a time is automatically stored in your brain at the time of its engagement. The limbic system, structures within the brain that directly correlate to emotion and memory, is activated when listening to music. There have been countless studies regarding the connection between music and autobiographical memory and why music can trigger certain emotional responses. There have also been studies which indicate mimicking your music selection with your mood– listening to melancholy music during times of turmoil– can provide comfort, which can aid in the healing process. The ways in which grief can manifest in the body are sensory effects to the cause just like the ways we engage with music are sensory effects to the cause. You see where I’m going here?

Music has healing properties, so I encourage those reading to tap into those parts that have been forgotten. Start small—no need to delve right into trauma– think about who you were a year ago, how have you grown? Sift through your library and find a song you remember enjoying this time last year. What kinds of emotions come to the surface and have those emotions evolved from their origin? I recommend sitting with it for a while and writing about what you’re experiencing. Is there a certain song or body of work that comes to mind for you while reading this? This is a call to embrace the elements of life that have brought you to this point, to gain a better understanding of the different components that create the whole.

As important as it is to reflect, it is equally important not to dwell on things that are out of our control or that we cannot change. As you dive into your library, it’s worthy of note that these are memories, and sometimes memory can be deceiving; each time you listen to a song, your neural catalog is updated, attaching a different memory to that song. Listening to Joni Mitchell won’t make your dog come back to life, but it might make you smile when you think about the times he’d stick his whole head out the window just so he could feel the sun on his face.